China Digital Times

China Digital Times

For Friday’s assignment, I explored The China Digital Times¬†and found an incredibly interesting article about modeling life in China. The article discusses how girls come to China on vacation visas and are placed in crammed apartments with many other models. The girls are managed by “handlers” who dictate the girls actions and book them jobs. If a girl does not do a job, she is most likely sent home. Often, these girls are incredibly young and are the mercy of the older male models. Girls work very minimal modeling jobs such as posing in front of an expensive car for eight or nine hours a day. Also, girls are put on restrictive eating diets.

What really interests me about this article is that the modeling industry in China may be only a smidgen less glamorous the modeling industry in other parts of the world. Regardless of geographical location, young girls are being forced to starve to fulfill this body image ideal that has been set. To me, China’s modeling industry is another sad example of the poor influence that popular culture has had on every day individual lives’.

 

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Here is the link to the article: http://sinosphere.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/01/14/a-dark-look-at-modeling-in-china/?_r=1

Image: David Gray for The New York Times

2 Responses »

  1. I completely agree with you. It is extremely sad that when it comes to modeling, women are expected to look and act a particular way. If they cannot meet up to a certain expectation, than their modeling job is over. In China however, girls are set home if they stop doing their job. Like Eileen said, I wonder if this rule applies in all areas of China?! In addition, does America follow the same practice as China by sending models who use vacation visas back to their home country if they do not continue modeling?! It would not be surprised if America does, but in a more settle way. Nonetheless, this practice is sad and is another example of the difference in gender roles throughout the world.

  2. I found your article to be incredibly interesting, as well as infuriating. As a woman interested in working in China, I often worry about the roles, views, and expectation of women are in China. Whereas the fashion industry is notoriously a competitive and high-pressure work environment worldwide, the nonchalance in which those in charge call themselves “handlers” and that prostitution is considered expected side-work in China for these women is sickening. I think it would be interesting to see whether the treatment of women in other areas of Chinese society is as cruel. It seems to me that beauty standards there are even higher than in the United States, and I wonder how Chinese women feel about that. All of the first generation Asian women I have interacted with in my life have been self-deprecating about their own appearances, so it seems as if it is ingrained into their minds to the point that they don’t notice.

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